Thursday, 2 November 2017

Recycle, reuse - and monks

Films and songs are constantly being remade or re-recorded, so why not commercials? The now defunct Yellow Pages did it a few years ago, and I've recently seen an excellent new example from Xerox.

Now, I must admit that, growing up on this side of the Atlantic, I've never seen the original film from 1976, in which Brother Dominic has a little help from Xerox to achieve 'a miracle.'



More than 40 years later, so not to go the way of Kodak, the brand Xerox has to re-invent itself as going way beyond photocopiers, in order to stay relevant in the 21st century. So the new campaign - sorry, platform - 'Set the Page Free' has been created. The 500 copies must now be translated, personalised, shared around the world and so on.

By taking on where the old commercial left off, Xerox stresses its pedigree, trustworthiness and reliability as well as its innovative new side.

Sometimes the best - and most effective - creativity isn't about creating something completely new:



It's been a bit of a week for monks. Here in Germany (Hessen) we had a public holiday to celebrate 500 years of the Reformation. One of Playmobil's best-selling lines has been the Martin Luther figure.

But probably the strangest Martin Luther-related packaging that I've seen is this. I may be wrong, but surely tomatoes had not yet been brought to Europe in Martin Luther's time? Or does this celebrate the 500th anniversary of that event, too?




6 comments:

WILLIE........! =^..^= said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sue Imgrund said...

While we are reminiscing, I suppose the first experience I had with duplicating machines was what we used to call 'banda machines' (Sp.????) at school. The copies were in purple ink and they smelled heavenly!

WILLIE........! =^..^= said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Barbara Fisher said...

Hi Sue, I enjoyed both the Xerox commercials, although the earlier one had the element of surprise, which was lacking in the new one.
I can honestly say I’ve ever given tomatoes a lot of thought but according to FlavorFresh Tomatoes didn’t arrive in Europe until the 16th Century, although it is not known how. It has been said that they were brought back from Central America by Spanish Conquistadors. Another legend suggests that two Jesuit priests brought them to Italy from Mexico. Others say Columbus brought the first tomato to Europe.
So now we all know. :)

Sue Imgrund said...

And why the Americans say To-mate-o and the Brits say Tom-ar-to will remain a mystery!

Barbara Fisher said...

Potato, potahto, tomato, tomahto.
Let's call the whole thing off :-)